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If you missed On Call with Wendy Wiese, listen here!

Our Cravings Tribe and the reVolution-not-resolution journey we’re on for the next few weeks — or maybe for ever! —  were the focus of On Call with Wendy Wiese on Relevant Radio yesterday afternoon. It was a great conversation. Thank you, Wendy, for making the time for this topic. If you missed it, you can listen on playback at the link below.

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https://relevantradio.com/programs/on-call-with-wendy-wiese

Week two: getting beyond the dieting delusion

We are one week into our journey! How are you doing? Is it easier or more difficult than expected? Are you feeling any shifts — emotionally, physically, spiritually? I know it’s early in the game, but sometimes the push-off can be dramatic, making us aware of our habits and triggers. And awareness is a big part of this transformation process. Take a look back at your journal from this past week, if you’ve been keeping one, and see what your days looked like. I’ll give you a few insights into mine: Read more

Revolution 2017 is coming! Join the #CravingsTribe Become a #SoulSurvivor

If you build it, they will come.

Thank you to everyone — in the comment section on this blog, on my Facebook page, and in my email inbox — who have said YES! to the #CravingsTribe. We are on our way. Read more

Skip the resolutions and go for a personal revolution I’m forming a tribe for 2017. Who’s in?

I don’t know about you, but right about now I could use a tribe, a group of like-minded folks who want to band together for support on the journey. I was thinking recently about ways to reinvigorate some of my spiritual and physical practices—from regular prayer and healthy eating to more exercise and less distraction—and I decided I’d commit to practicing what I preach and work through one of my own books, Cravings: A Catholic Wrestles Food, Self-Image, and God. Then I thought about how much better this would be if I could do it as part of a group, or maybe even lead the group, or at least serve as Cheerleader in Chief. Read more

Sometimes happiness isn’t a choice.

My Life Lines column, running in the current issue of Catholic New York:

My hands look older than my mother’s hands ever did. That’s what I was thinking at Mass last Sunday when I should have been focused on more spiritual pursuits. But I couldn’t get past the sudden, albeit not surprising, realization that I am aging far beyond anything my mother experienced in her 47 years. Thanks to a couple of small-but-disturbing age spots and prominent veins, my hands remind me that life is moving at breakneck speed and I might want to take stock of things. Read more

What are the cravings that throw you off course?

This week I had a great conversation about food, self-acceptance, and spirituality when I hung out on-air with Allison Gingras, host of Reconciled to You. It was such a fun interview, and I loved getting the chance to revisit my book Cravings: A Catholic Wrestles with Food, Self-Image, and God. After talking with Allison for an hour, I think I need to re-read my own book! And make a date to visit with her in person because I think we were separated at birth, even if I’m way ahead of her on the age trajectory.

If you missed the show, you can listen to the podcast here:

Are you brave enough to take off your cape?

“It’s braver to be Clark Kent than it is to be Superman.” That’s the heart of this amazing talk by Glennon Doyle Melton, author of Carry on Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed and my new hero. In fact, she is a superhero in my book. Please watch this clip, “Lessons From the Mental Hospital.” Yes, it’s 17 minutes long and worth every minute of your time. She is amazing. Because she speaks the truth, a truth we all need to hear, even if we are not quite ready to acknowledge it yet. Read more

The Bridgemaker explores Cravings

Here’s what Alex Blackwell of The BridgeMaker had to say about Cravings:

“In revealing this personal journey, Mary creates a safe space where readers can begin to reflect on their own relationships with food, and with themselves. Read more